Tag Archives: Landscape paintings

More Summer Paintings – 2015

 

Marshall Point Light, Port Clyde, Maine, 9 x 12 in.

Marshall Point Light, Port Clyde, Maine, 9 x 12 in.

Here is another group of my more successful of plein air paintings done this summer.

Sunlit Cove, Boothbay Harbor, ME., .8 x 10 in., oil on linen

Sunlit Cove, Boothbay Harbor, ME., .8 x 10 in., oil on linen. Sold

Mother and Daiughter, Rockland, Maine, 12 x 16in. oil on linen

Mother and Daiughter, Rockland, Maine, 12 x 16in. oil on linen. Sold

Acadia Rocks, Maine, 9 x 12 in. oil on linen

Acadia Rocks, Maine, 9 x 12 in. oil on linen

Methodist Church, Thomaston, Maine, 11x 14 in. oil on linen

Methodist Church, Thomaston, Maine, 11x 14 in. oil on linen

Tenants Harbor, Maine, 6 x 6 in., oil on linen on board

Tenants Harbor, Maine, 6 x 6 in., oil on linen on board

This small painting above is coming up for auction through my painted Journal”painted postcards” blog, where I auction  or sell at fixed price paintings starting at $90. Click here to see.

Boathouses, Calverts Marina, Solomon's MD., 10 x 11 in. oil on linen

Boathouses, Calverts Marina, Solomon’s MD., 10 x 11 in. oil on linen

Setup painting the Boat houses in Solomon's, MD.

Setup painting the Boat houses in Solomon’s, MD.

View of Saubrigues, Aquitaine, France, 5 x 8 in., oil on linen

View of Saubrigues, Aquitaine, France

View of Saubrigues, Aquitaine, France, 5 x 8 in., oil on linen

View of Saubrigues, Aquitaine, France, 5 x 8 in., oil on linen

Here is a sketch I did for my friends who I visited in SW France in July 2013.

Pulcino della Minerva (Berninis Elephant), Roma, 10 x 8 in., Oil

Pulcino Della Minerva (Bernini”s Elephant), Roma, 10 x 8 in., Oil

Pulcino della Minerva (Berninis Elephant), Roma, 10 x 8 in., Oil

Pulcino della Minerva (Berninis Elephant), Roma, 10 x 8 in.,

I did this cityscape  painting over two days at the Piazza della Minerva in Rome, Italy, one block behind the Pantheon, which you see in the background.

This  is one of the most curious monuments of Rome, the so-called Pulcino della Minerva. It is a statue designed by the Baroque era sculptor Gian Lorenzo Bernini of an elephant as the supporting base for the Egyptian obelisk found in the Dominicans’ garden. The  obelisk was  brought to Rome by Diocletian, during his reign as emperor from 284 to 305, for placement at the Temple of Isis, which stood nearby.

The inspiration for the unusual composition came from Hypnerotomachia Poliphili (“Poliphilo’s Dream of the Strife of Love”), an unusual 15th century novel probably by Francesco Colonna. The novel’s main character meets an elephant made of stone carrying an obelisk, and the accompanying woodcut illustration in the book is quite similar to Bernini’s design for the base for the obelisk. The curious placement of the obelisk through the body of the elephant is identical.

The name for the structure, Pulcino, is  the Italian for a small or little “chick”. This may have been a reference to the comparatively short height of the obelisk or, an obscure reference to the major charity of the Dominicans ( whose church, Santa Maria sopra Minerva,  is in the piazza) to assist young women needing dowries, who made a procession in the courtyard every year.

Chiesa di Santa Brigida, Oil, 8×10 in.(Sold)

Chiesa di Santa Brigida, Roma (St. Bridget's Church), 8 x 10 in. oil on linen,

Chiesa di Santa Brigida, Roma (St. Bridget’s Church), 8 x 10 in. oil on linen,

This painting was done on a cool March night on the Piazza Farnese. My biggest audience were the waiters running back and forth to their storeroom and murmuring words of encouragement: “bella, bella!”

This is the Chiesa di Santa Brigida, a small Swedish church dedicated to Saint Bridget of Sweden, who travelled to Rome in 1350 where she started a new order. The Farnese Palace would be to my left.

Painting in Rome's historic center with Giovanni Ragone and Marco Carloni.

Meeting Other Landscape Painters or Sketchers When You Travel

painting in rome's historic center with Giovanni Ragone and Marco Carloni.

Painting in Rome’s historic center with Giovanni Ragone and Marco Carloni.

By far the best part of my  trip to Italy to paint and learn about the culture,  has been the local painters and fellow artists I met here.

How did I find them? Continue reading

Trajans Column, Rome, 8 x 8 in., Oil

Trajans Column, Rome, 8 x 8 in., Oil

Trajans Column, Rome 8 x8 in., Oil

Trajans Column, Rome, 8 x8 in., Oil

I did this landscape painting in Rome, Italy on a day painting with a few of my Roman plein air friends. It’s near the busiest tourist area, and luckily several good spots for inexpensive espresso and pizza were nearby.

Trajan’s Column (Italian: Colonna Traiana) is a column in Rome, Italy, that commemorates Roman emperor Trajan’s victory in the Dacian Wars.  It is located in Trajan’s Forum, built near the Quirinal Hill, north of the Roman Forum. Completed in AD 113, the freestanding column is most famous for its spiral bas-relief, which artistically describes the epic wars between the Romans and Dacians (101–102 and 105–106).

The structure is about 30 metres (98 ft) in height, 35 metres (125 ft) including its large pedestal. The shaft is made from a series of 20 colossal Carrara marble drums, each weighing about 32 tons, with a diameter of 3.7 metres (11 ft). The 190-metre (625 ft) frieze winds around the shaft 23 times. Inside the shaft, a spiral staircase of 185 stairs provides access to a viewing platform at the top. The capital block of Trajan’s Column weighs 53.3 tons, which had to be lifted to a height of c. 34 m.[2]

Ancient coins indicate preliminary plans to top the column with a statue of a bird, probably an eagle,  but after construction, a statue of Trajan was put in place; this statue disappeared in the Middle Ages. On December 4, 1587, the top was crowned by Pope Sixtus V with a bronze figure of St. Peter, which remains to this day.